The Apple/Google Cold War

Once again, brilliant commentary by Mr. Gruber. I could not agree more

The Apple/Google Cold War:

During last week’s The Talk Show, I mentioned that Pocket-Lint got a statement from Apple PR regarding YouTube’s omission from Mountain Lion’s new system-wide sharing feature:

Most interesting of the three is the inclusion of Vimeo over YouTube, a choice that is bound to give the professional video-sharing site a boost in awareness and audience numbers, but also leave users wondering why no Google support from day one?

When asked why there was no YouTube support at the moment in the developer preview, Apple told Pocket-lint: “We have Vimeo, and we don’t have YouTube.”

Allow me to translate: “Fuck Google.

(Via Daring Fireball)

‘Google Tracked iPhones, Bypassing Apple Browser Privacy Settings’

Clearly this falls under do no evil don’t you agree?

‘Google Tracked iPhones, Bypassing Apple Browser Privacy Settings’:

Julia Angwin and Jennifer Valentino-DeVries for The Wall Street Journal:

To get around Safari’s default blocking, Google exploited a loophole in the browser’s privacy settings. While Safari does block most tracking, it makes an exception for websites with which a person interacts in some way—for instance, by filling out a form. So Google added coding to some of its ads that made Safari think that a person was submitting an invisible form to Google. Safari would then let Google install a cookie on the phone or computer.

Given all the privacy issues Apple has faced this week, with the address book issues, you have to think they are pissed about this one. This was a pretty self-serving and short-sighted move by Google.

Can’t wait to see how this one plays out.

(Via The Brooks Review)

 

Path uploads your iPhone’s entire address book to their servers

Pretty disappointing to know the we were not even given an option to opt-in;  not a good case of building trust with permission.

FYI: Path uploads your iPhone’s entire address book to their servers:

Blogger Arun Thampi discovered something that may or may not sit right about the free social media app Path while packet sniffing the app last night. Upon first installing the app and registering for an account, Path sends each one of your contacts in your address book to their server via a. plist. The .plist includes full names, phone numbers, and e-mails.

Path makes the call “https://api.path.com/3/contacts/add” when you first create an account, and it uploads all your contacts to its server. In most people’s mind, this obviously makes them feel a little uncomfortable. Thampi details the technical aspects of this, and how you can recreate it yourself, in his blog post.

Path’s Cofounder and CEO Dave Morin commented on the situation and said iPhone users will soon be able to opt-out of the setting in an update that will roll out to the App Store shortly. Nevertheless, does that really change anything? He did not really explain why Path is doing this, and your entire address book is still on their servers. You can read Morin’s comment after the break:

We believe that this type of friend finding & matching is important to the industry and that it is important that users clearly understand it, so we proactively rolled out an opt-in for this on our Android client a few weeks ago and are rolling out the opt-in for this in 2.0.6 of our iOS Client, pending App Store approval.

(Via 9 to 5 Mac)

Back to the Future

Is it me or is the new Samsung Note something we have seen before…just bigger?

 

And didn’t we think that it was a pain in the ass to use the pen – and you would loose it? Look at the sculptured end of the pen…hmmmm.